better outdoor living at home spring


Flowering Pear Trees Create a Stately Border


If you’ve ever wondered what a border row of flowering ornamental trees would look like in your yard, this yard’s beautiful row of pears may give you some inspiration.

When we drove past this beautiful house in a nearby neighborhood the other day, with its lovely, tidy, and uniform row of pear trees all in bloom, we had to stop and take a couple of photos. The yard of this house is pretty nicely designed, and what made these flowering trees even more striking is how they were placed in the landscape.

 

pears-in-bloom

 

These pear trees (looked like there are 9 trees – not sure what type of pear) were used in the design as a border planting running in between the side property line and the driveway, from the front near the street, almost back to the garage. This tree can grow to approximately 40 in height and approximately 10 to 20 feet in width, which makes it a good choice for a residential project. They really have an estate-like presence, don’t you think?

 

pears-border

 

Did you notice the repeating pattern in the tree planting? Repetition is used in classic design quite often. The repetition is created by the trees being identical trees, with the same spacing, and in the same size, which creates a very comfortable visual rhythm. The homeowner has installed uplighting near the base of the trees, which also creates a repeating pattern at night, providing a beautiful evening ambience.

 

pears-blooming

 

The row of trees also helps to re-enforce the edge of the yard, and actually becomes an outdoor ‘wall’. Something else that a tree border such as this can do is to have a filtered screening effect which can provide a sense of privacy during the warmer seasons when outdoor activities are high. Of course, a row of evergreens would provide year round screening.

 

Side note about ornamental pear trees: If you are thinking about pear trees for your yard, select one of the stronger varieties, like ‘Cleveland Select’. The branching of Bradford pears grow upright creating narrow and weak crotch angles that can break easily in a forceful wind. The flowers of ornamental pears can be showy, but they’re not pleasantly fragrant – it may not be pleasant to some people, and others may not mind it at all.

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